Powered by Google
Home
New This Week
Listings
8 days
- - - - - - - - - - - -
Art
Astrology
Books
Dance
Food
Hot links
Movies
Music
News + Features
Television
Theater
- - - - - - - - - - - -
Classifieds
Adult
Personals
Adult Personals
- - - - - - - - - - - -
Archives
Work for us
RSS


Table of contents for week of October 24, 2003

NEWS & FEATURES

Twenty-five years. A landmark number. Two-and-a-half turbulent, restless decades. Approximately 1300 issues. Countless words, headlines, captions, photos, comics, illustrations. The first quarter-century of the Providence Phoenix commemorated in a huge, special section:

Ian Donnis interviews Donald L. Carcieri.

Brian C. Jones interviews Lincoln Chafee.

Ian Donnis interviews US Senator Jack Reed.

Bill Flanagan considers the impact of the Phoenix on the New Providence.

Jim Macnie looks back on twenty-five years of live music in Providence.

You can't have a superhero movie without an origin story, and you can't have an anniversary issue without one, either. By Ted Widmer.

Phillipe and Jorge have derogatorily nicknamed just about anyone unfortunate enough to make the news over the past twenty-five years. They list some of their favorites.

Rudy Cheeks examines the life of a Phoenix columnist and determines that, while it's not as exciting or sexy as you might think, it's pretty darn good.

Providence has not always been the easiest city to fall in love with. But Rob Tannenbaum proves that, given enough time, Providence can win anyone over.

Sports in an allegedly alternative paper? Surely you jest. Yet Chip Young found a way to make it work.

What good is an alternative paper if you can't bash a huge, corporate enemy? Brian C. Jones takes a few whacks at the Providence Journal. Seriously, guys, no hard feelings.

The transition from the NewPaper to the Phoenix wasn't without its growing pains. Lisa Prevost guides us through a very special time in a young newspaper's life.

We're not sure what Scott Duhamel was on when he worked at the Phoenix. Maybe he doesn't even know. Whatever it was, he had a hell of a time.

You think it's easy getting your foot in the door at a fast-paced, ultra-competitive, free, alternative weekly? Not unless you can write like Evelyn McDonnell.

Big boobs, blessing or curse? That question is only tangentially related to Michael Tanaka's piece on the opportunities the Phoenix presented him, but as a lead-in, you can't do much better.

Bill Rodriguez considers cultural criticism an art in itself, which makes this criticism of cultural criticism downright sublime.

If we can be serious for a moment - and only a moment - a special paper like the Phoenix can become a valued part of someone's life. Johnette Rodriguez keeps it in the family.

David Andrew Stoler's piece is not actually about sex, but you'd never guess that from the opening paragraphs. It is, however, about how the Phoenix made him a man. The article is much better than this description makes it sound.

Believe it or not, we've a story unrelated to the 25th anniversary. Don't say we never did anything for you. Dan Kennedy looks at the Atlantic six months after Michael Kelly's death.

Phillipe & Jorge's Cool, Cool World: Stars and stripes forever

Out There: Equal-riots amendment

Ask Dr. Lovemonkey: Love fest

Editors' Picks


Plus, this just in:
ACTION SPEAKS: Plumbing the impact of student radicals
ALTERNATIVE TRANSIT: Trail advocates bring new life to abandoned railroads
CITYWATCH: Lupo’s steady, more art downtown

Astrology: Moon Signs


MUSIC

The Eyesores defy easy categorization, and listening to their music is not for the faint of heart. Bob Gulla says that's all part of their charm.

Missionaries of cool The Strokes are back, bringing relief to aimless hipsters everywhere. Sean Richardson reviews Room on Fire.

This is more like it. Paul Westerberg returns with a new solo album. On Come Feel Me Tremble, Matt Ashare says Westerberg sounds more inspired than he has in years.

Also, short reviews of:
THE BOUNCING SOULS: ANCHORS AWEIGH
BILL MALLONE: PERFUME LETTER
THE ROSEBUDS: MAKE OUT
JIMMY RYAN: LOST DIAMOND ANGEL
TEN BENSON: BENSON BURNER
RUFUS WAINWRIGHT: WANT ONE
WOLFSHEIM: CASTING SHADOWS

Go for a ride: Roadtripping


FILM

This week's trailers:
RADIO
TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE

THEATER

Bat Boy: The Musical. Sometimes these things just review themselves. Bill Rodriguez says it's great fun.

Worth the Trip:
8 by Tenn at Hartford Stage.

DANCE

Island Moving Co. was rained out when its show Surrender opened outdoors in July. Most likely, that won't happen at its indoor premiere on October 30. Story by Johnette Rodriguez.

Worth the Trip:
Don Quixote at the Boston Ballet.
Facing Mekka at the Cutler Majestic.

ART

Drawings are a medium that’s much neglected by everyone but artists, it seems. The Providence Art Club tries to give credit where credit is due. By Bill Rodriguez.

Worth the Trip: ‘Splat Boom Pow!’

BOOKS

W.S. Merwin's poems touch the heart and move the spirit. He chats with our Johnette Rodriguez.

John Freeman reviews Elizabeth Costello, the new genre-buster from J.M. Coetzee.

TELEVISION

Chicks kicking butt has become a staple of network television over the past few seasons, and we couldn't be happier about it. Joyce Millman reviews Karen Sisco and Tru Calling.

Hot dots: Wednesday 9:30 (2) American Masters: James Brown: Soul Survivor. At age 70, the Godfather of Soul surely qualifies as the genre's Grandfather as well. A celebration of the hardest-working man in show biz.

FOOD

Opia aims high and barely misses its mark, but has the potential to make a splash in Providence. By Johnette Rodriguez.

SPECIALS

The Best 2002
Listings Index
Personals
Classifieds









home | feedback | masthead | about the phoenix | find the phoenix | advertising info | privacy policy | work for us

 © 2000 - 2017 Phoenix Media Communications Group